H22015

MIA: Inside The Sagamore Hotel Art Events

By Pamela Campani December 15, 2015

On Dec. 5 the Sagamore known as the art hotel welcomed over 3000 of the world’s most prominent artist, curators gallerists and art lovers to the 14th Annual Art Basel Brunch. The following week they exhibited many artworks in collaboration with several artist and organizations.

At the entrance of the hotel was an interactive installation titled Portal that connected residents and guests to strangers in Portal locations around the world, including Afghanistan, Cuba, Honduras, Mexico and more. This work is a global public art initiative linking locations around the world through gold shipping containers equipped with immersive audio-visual technology. Inside the portal you come face-to-face with a life-size person in a distant location as if they were in the same room. Postals created by Shared studios and artist Amar Bakshi currently exist in seven locations, including a Syrian refugee camp in Jordan. More thanks 7,000 people have engaged with each other through Portals, artists have collaborated thorough and even families have been reunited.

A massive hotel-wide video installation was curated by Lori Zippay, EAI’s Executive Director. All media artworks were selected from the extensive EAI archive from several artist, and presented formal, conceptual or perceptual transformations of natural landscapes and environments. The works cover five decades and range from playful to socially resonant.

Another piece on display was a site-specific installation created by renowned sculptor, Alan Sonfist. The installation was inspired by the artist’s stay at the Sagamore and the natural beauty of the elements that surround the beautiful property. It features a metal frozen in time visualizing the invisible elements such as time and space, and creates a remarkable contrast between man-made objects and nature. A time-lapse video of the building of the sculptor was shown during the brunch and on the hotel televisions.

Some of the notable attendees included renowned art critic and curator, Jerome Sans; Executive Director and Chief Curator of the Bass Museum of Art Miami Beach, Silvia Karman Cubiña; Owner of the Fredric Snitzer Gallery, Fred Snitzer; philanthropist Griselda Breene; renowned photographer Robin Hill; Art Basel VIP Director Stephanie Reed and guest curator Lori Zippay.

Source: http://hauteliving.com/2015/12/mia-inside-the-sagamore-hotel-art-events/596248/

KALW: A public art 'portal' connects Bay Area residents to citizens across the world

KALW: A public art 'portal' connects Bay Area residents to citizens across the world

Two young trombone players are performing a duet inside a shipping container in a emptied lot in Hayes Valley. The musicians, Harry Gonzalez and Brett Wyatt, are from the San Francisco Symphony Youth Orchestra, and they address their audience through the screen in front of them. 

Vice: A Golden Portal into the Art World Opens in Miami

Vice: A Golden Portal into the Art World Opens in Miami

“What is beautiful to you?” It's the question that curators will ask participants around the world when they step inside a large gold shipping container for a project titled Portals that seeks to interface with the global art world. The initiative, part of Art Basel Miami Beach, is taking place this week outside of the Sagamore Hotel in Miami with real-time connections to counterparts in Afghanistan, Cuba, Honduras, Iran, Mexico, and Zimbabwe.

Miami Hurricane: Best bets for Art Basel Week Miami 2015

Miami Hurricane: Best bets for Art Basel Week Miami 2015

The Sagamore is known as the Art Hotel because of its permanent and changing exhibitions. But this year’s highlight, The Portal, is designed to foster understanding in ways far beyond the visual. For 20 minutes at a time, visitors can step inside a gold, internet-enabled shipping container and talk with an individual in Afghanistan, Cuba or Iran. The year-old project was founded by Amar Bakshi, a former journalist who wanted others to experience the kind of meaningful interactions with strangers he had while traveling. “We’re creating a space where people encounter one another with no particular purpose” — a kind of global public square. Language won’t be an issue; each portal is staffed with both a translator and a local curator.

Newsweek: Digital Portal Lets U.N. Visitors Step Inside Za'atari Refugee Camp

Newsweek: Digital Portal Lets U.N. Visitors Step Inside Za'atari Refugee Camp

Iman, Dania and Marwa are talking about their lives in Zaatari, the largest refugee camp in the Middle East and home to more than 82,000 Syrians. Iman wants to be a journalist, Dania is focused on improving her English, and Marwa misses her three children, who live with their father in Syria.

NBC: San Francisco Portal Project Invites Unlikely Conversations

NBC: San Francisco Portal Project Invites Unlikely Conversations

The future of communication has arrived in the Bay Area — and it looks an awful lot like a shipping container. A shipping container someone spray-painted gold. The container in question was perched behind a chain-link fence near San Francisco’s Hayes Green, next to other shipping containers that had retired from hauling stuff and were now home to shops selling clothes, coffee and ice cream.

ARCA TV: Portales, Una Alternativa A Lo Impersonal

ARCA TV: Portales, Una Alternativa A Lo Impersonal

Es un época complicada para conocer gente cara a cara; cada vez hay más alternativas digitales que le quitan lo personal a los encuentros, magníficas herramientas para socializar, pero no siempre para conocerse.

Portales es justamente una alternativa digital a lo impersonal, es una forma casi mágica de conocer gente de otros países mediante una ‘tecnología audiovisual inmersiva’ en la que sientes que prácticamente puedes tocar a tu contraparte.

AdWeek: How the United Nations Is Using Virtual Reality to Boost Global Diplomacy Modern storytelling comes to life

AdWeek: How the United Nations Is Using Virtual Reality to Boost Global Diplomacy Modern storytelling comes to life

During the United Nations' 70th General Assembly last week, the U.N. attempted to bridge the gap between world leaders and Syrian refugees with a mix of virtual reality, documentary-style videos and good, old-fashioned conversation. It's an example of modern storytelling on one of the world's biggest stages that tech-minded marketers could learn from

TimeOut Magazine: Enter a Portal to Iran (or Honduras, or Cuba) in This Hayes Valley Art Experience

TimeOut Magazine: Enter a Portal to Iran (or Honduras, or Cuba) in This Hayes Valley Art Experience

There's a new tenant in Hayes Valley's Proxy space, sandwiched between the Smitten ice cream stand and the lager-slinging Biergarten. This time, though, the addition isn't another hipster-approved juice bar or gluten-free bakery: This is a wormhole to another country hosted by Shared Studios, a global public art project.

Newsweek Magazine: Digital Portal Lets U.N. Visitors Step Inside Zaatari Refugee Camp

Newsweek Magazine: Digital Portal Lets U.N. Visitors Step Inside Zaatari Refugee Camp

Iman, Dania and Marwa are talking about their lives in Zaatari, the largest refugee camp in the Middle East and home to more than 82,000 Syrians. Iman wants to be a journalist, Dania is focused on improving her English, and Marwa misses her three children, who live with their father in Syria.

All three stress the need to bring better education, including a university, to the camp, which is located in western Jordan near the Syrian border. All three want to go home someday.

Quartz: The UN is using virtual reality and an immersive “wormhole” to connect diplomats with Syrian refugeesquart

Quartz: The UN is using virtual reality and an immersive “wormhole” to connect diplomats with Syrian refugeesquart

On their way to this month’s 70th United Nation’s General Assembly, the organization’s annual high-level meeting in New York, diplomats and world leaders will pass by a makeshift glass structure—both a glossy multi-media hub, and a gateway to an entirely different world.

JUXTAPOZ: Portals Project Opens Gateway From SF To Tehran

JUXTAPOZ: Portals Project Opens Gateway From SF To Tehran

San Francisco will soon be home to the latest gateway in the Portals Project, a public art project curated by Shared_Studios that uses design and technology to connect strangers and artists across the globe. So what exactly is a portal? A portal is a retrofitted shipping container painted gold and immersed with audio and visual technology inside. 

McClatchy: Who’s that in the room with me? A virtual stranger.

McClatchy: Who’s that in the room with me? A virtual stranger.

The large gold shipping container seems out of place in a courtyard of the University of Maryland’s performing arts center. But when it comes to art, expect the unexpected - this container is actually a portal, an entryway for a visitor to be teleported. Here you can have a conversation with a stranger in a far-off place who appears to be standing right in front of you.

Washingtonian: This Art Installation Uses Shipping Containers to Introduce You to People Around the World

Washingtonian: This Art Installation Uses Shipping Containers to Introduce You to People Around the World

Imagine stepping inside a shipping container and coming face-to-face with a live feed of a stranger inside another container in Tehran. Thanks to audio-visual technology, that’s exactly what you can experience September 10 through 15 during the NextNOW Fest at the Clarice.
These so-called “Portals” operate like wormholes, connecting people in Washington to people in cities like Herat, Afghanistan or El Progreso, Honduras. A translator stands on the opposite end, enabling a 20-minute conversation between two people who live in completely different parts of the world. Inside these gold-painted containers, though, they might feel like they’re in the same room.

Hoodline: A 'Portal' To Other Countries Opens Today In Hayes Valley

Hayes Valley's new portal to the world opened its door to the neighborhood this morning, offering the opportunity to chat live through video with individuals in Cuba, Honduras, Mexico, Afghanistan and Iran.

The portals are a project of interactive arts and technology collective Shared Studios, whose mission is "carving wormholes in the world." This portal is the first of its kind to come to San Francisco, but, as we noted last month, locations have previously been set up in New York, New Haven and Washington D.C. 

The portal is housed in a gold shipping container located between Biergarten and Linden Street. The interior of the shipping container features carpeted walls and floors for soundproofing from the noisy neighborhood outside. Inside are two chairs and a table; on the far wall, a large image is projected of the person you'll be talking with.

20-minute appointments can be made on the Shared Studios site: you can connect with Cuba and Honduras from 11am-2pm, and with Afghanistan or Iran from 7:30pm to 10:30pm. Since the launch this morning, it's been a bit slow, but Friday night is already completely booked. However, the portal will be open until November 18th, so there'll be ample time to set up an appointment.

If you'd like to check out the setup, meet the creator and learn more about the project, Shared Studios will be hosting a grand opening event this Friday from 6-7:30pm. They'll hand out tokens for free Smitten ice cream to the first 20 people to arrive, and music will come courtesy of the City of Trees Brass Band. A live Q&A will start at 7pm with creator Amar Bakshi, and at 7:30pm the portal will connect to Afghanistan. More details can be found on the event page