Herat

PBS News Hour: Strangers step inside this portal to make global connections

PBS News Hour: Strangers step inside this portal to make global connections

JUDY WOODRUFF: Now: an art project attempting to build individual connections across the globe.

It’s called Portals, and is the brainchild of artist and former television news producer Amar Bakshi, who told us that, in his former profession, the most meaningful conversations often came once the cameras were turned off.

WAMU Art Beat: 'Portal': A Shipping Container-Turned-Art Project Connecting People Across the Globe

WAMU Art Beat: 'Portal': A Shipping Container-Turned-Art Project Connecting People Across the Globe

A global art project recently came to D.C., bringing visitors face-to-face with strangers in Afghanistan, Iran and Cuba. Hundreds of people signed up online to book 20-minute-long one-on-one conversations in the Portal, a shipping container outfitted with video, audio and Internet.

The Washington Post: At Woodrow Wilson Plaza, a Portal to connect with faraway strangers5

The Washington Post: At Woodrow Wilson Plaza, a Portal to connect with faraway strangers5

Nick Meeker made a new Facebook friend last week.

Her name is Mahsa Biglow, and she is a 25-year-old Iranian graduate student in photography at the University of Tehran. They met on the Internet — but not in any of the usual ways.

The Hoya: 7,500 Miles in 15 Minutes

The Hoya: 7,500 Miles in 15 Minutes

As students rushed to and from their classes in the Edmund A. Walsh Memorial building this week, they passed by a nondescript gold shipping container on N Street — unaware that, inside, unprecedented conversations were taking place.

Participants who stepped into the box, titled the “Portal to Afghanistan,” were digitally transported thousands of miles away to have a full-body video chat with a complete stranger in Herat, Afghanistan.